Did you know that there is such a thing as a coffee enthusiast? For these people, the ultimate goal is the best tasting coffee brew ever known to man. They usually shun modern machines in favor of more traditional, and manual ways of getting that perfect brew. The automatic coffee maker has no room in this field. It is implicitly implied that manually brewing has better results, owing to the better quality control and the “personal” touch that go into the preparation. Of course, there is nothing bad about espresso machines as they have their pros and set of cons as well. There is just that artisan flair when you manually brew and ground your own coffee beans.

What is the “manual” style of Coffee Brewing?

Manual in this context simply is the exclusion of anything automatic or any mechanism controlled by a machine or an electrical component. The method is usually poured and then allowed to drip, or pressed by hand through different kinds of presses that force the flavor of the ground coffee beans through filters. Water is meticulously kept at the optimal temperature to bring about the best flavors from the beans. Below are the manual styles of coffee brewing and their brief descriptions.

The Coffee Cone

The coffee cone is one of the oldest and most straightforward ways of brewing this beverage. A cone-shaped contraption usually made of ceramic, plastic, glass, or stainless steel that the filter goes into. Interestingly, the shape of the cone and the filters within will influence the flavors that come out on the other end.

 

The Chemex

This type of pour-over drip coffee brewer is just a staple among coffee enthusiasts, its most prominent feature, which is the wood handle and a distinct leather cord has remained unchanged ever since its iteration in 1941. This kind of drip design involves carefully controlling the pour rate and the coarseness of the beans. This yields a delicately flavored beverage with plenty left over for the family breakfast table.

The French Press

This invention is widely considered as the best and easiest method of brewing coffee in the manual way possible. It produces superior and consistent coffee due to the press mechanism involved. Coffee is brewed by placing coarsely ground coffee into a pitcher with a plunger where you slowly press the coffee and extract its flavors. A cheesecloth filter or a metal mesh is responsible for the filtering and separating the flavors. A modern version of this coffee press, however, is usually made up of glass with nylon mesh or a stainless steel component as the plunger.

The Aeropress

This is a more modern version of the French press and is a relative newcomer in the manual coffee brewing field. It is of a plastic construction and comes in three parts. A filter that sits in the coffee basket and sits at the bottom of the brew chamber. What is unique about this is that air pressure is used to force the flavors out into the coffee chamber.

The Stovetop Moka Pot

This contraption uses steam pressure from boiling water in the lower chamber to pass through the coffee grounds in the middle chamber and then through a filter and then going through the coffee chamber. The resulting flavors are strong and may be too bitter for some.

These are some of the more traditional ways of producing coffee. This is for those who are really discerning coffee lover who want nothing more than the best taste they can get out of their beloved beverage.